How Pipeline Monitoring Works

Over the past five years West Virginia has experienced a boom in shale gas development. Now, the energy industry is seeking to build new major natural gas pipelines 
to move the produced gas to market.

To respond to this new threat TU and WV Rivers are training volunteers to monitor water quality along pipeline routes as part of the WV-VA Water Quality Monitoring Program. The pipeline monitoring protocol is designed to identify and minimize potential impacts from pipeline development on sensitive water, fish and wildlife resources.






Pipeline construction can cause sedimentation and stream bank erosion, resulting in muddied streams, like the one 
pictured above. Photo by Michael Barrick

Volunteer monitors participating in pipeline monitoring
will complete three phases of monitoring:


Phase 1: Conduct water quality monitoring before pipeline construction begins to establish baseline watershed conditions. 

Phase 2:
Conduct water quality monitoring and visual reconnaissance during pipeline construction to identify potential pollution events and assess temporary erosion and sedimentation best management practices. 

Phase 3: Conduct water quality monitoring and visual reconnaissance after pipeline construction is completed to identify potential pollution events and assess permanent erosion and sedimentation best management practices.

If you'd like to be notified of upcoming volunteer training opportunities sign-up here.




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